An introduction to the literary criticism of emily dickinsons poetry

Dickinson is playing feminist.

because i could not stop for death

However, the poet received none of this critical acclaim during her lifetime. Commentators have since analyzed nearly every aspect of Dickinson's poems from a myriad of critical perspectives, including linguistic, stylistic, psychoanalytical, philosophical, and historical.

Among the or so classic works found in her family library some of which may not have been in the library during her lifetime and a few hundred more mundane works and popular novels that she discussed in letters, it is unlikely that she had read more than a handful of philosophers, poets, and novelists.

Although many of the poems that she had written were not published till after she was dead; ironically, many of her poems revolve around the subject of death. This last preoccupation is especially apparent in Poem also known as "Because I could not stop for Death—" , in which eternal rest is imagined as a carriage ride. The result is a distinctive and revolutionary poetic style quite unlike that of her nineteenth-century contemporaries. A similar theme of empowerment has been detected in Poem "I dwell in Possibility—" , which many critics have maintained is a commentary on the ability of the female artist to subvert the oppressive limitations of the patriarchal order through the transcendental power of poetry. Emily's brother, Austin, followed in his father's footsteps by becoming a partner in the family law practice and by succeeding his father as treasurer of Amherst College. Although the poem continues to be read over one hundred years after it was written, there is little sense of the time period within which it was composed. She left school early, living a reclusive life on the family homestead. Once deemed as eccentric, both Dickinson's poems and her way of life are now more commonly recognized as an uncompromising commitment to artistic expression and, in the opinion of some critics, as an attempt to undermine the restrictive masculine culture of her time. Her poetry breaks from the traditional style with dashes to separate ideas.

Academic web site. They were raised in Puritanical Massachusetts.

imagery in emily dickinsons poetry

Major themes, Figurative Language, and Literary Technique used by Emily Dickinson were all of her characteristics of her towering achievement in American poetry.

Influenced most by the Bible, Shakespeareand the seventeenth century metaphysicals noted for their extravagant metaphors in linking disparate objectsshe wrote poems on grief, love, death, loss, affection, and longing. In their first correspondence, she asked him if her poems were "alive" and if they "breathed.

Emily Dickinson. Emily Dickinson at-a-glance.

The reader is led through the poem by the shape of her stanza forms, typically quatrains, and her unusual emphasis of words, either through capitalization or line position. Dickinson's attachment to Austin's children and his wife, Susan, was especially close. Her fascicle 22, which includes Poem , is one example. Whereas she had previously received and entertained numerous guests at the homestead, Dickinson now refused all visitors. Among the or so classic works found in her family library some of which may not have been in the library during her lifetime and a few hundred more mundane works and popular novels that she discussed in letters, it is unlikely that she had read more than a handful of philosophers, poets, and novelists. Occasionally, the one will dominate the other. The poem is broken up into two short stanzas, with the first acting as an analogy to the second I think this poem is presented to mock the sexist society of the middle nineteenth century for pressurizing girls to get married, have a family, have children and have a typical lifestyle. It is important to note that apart from one family account of this affair there is no evidence to substantiate the claim that it ever occurred. Some may find her preoccupation with death morbid, but this was not unusual for her time period. Some academics have posited that even more verses might be in existence as appendixes to Dickinson's voluminous correspondence with family, friends, and literary acquaintances, but that they have not yet been recognized by the letter recipients' inheritors.
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Literary Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poetry Essay